Korean style BBQ chops & a BLT - Dang Katie D.

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Korean style BBQ chops & a BLT - Dang Katie D.

Hey y'all!  I wanted to start a recipe-sharing thread as I explore cooking meat, specifically that from the rootin' tootin' variety.  Let's go hog wild ;)

chops Katie D.jpg

 

Here's the first we tried w/ pork chops.  2 chops served 4 adults w/ a side of sushi rice and stir-fried veggies.  Grilled 'em, Korean BBQ-style! http://www.jocooks.com/main-courses/pork-main-courses/korean-style-pork-chops/

chops plated katie D.jpg

Also, dove into the bacon and went straight for an good 'ole fashioned BLT w/ avo and a cold brew.  It was freaking delicious!

BLT Katie D.jpg

 

 

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Mazamarama Marinated pork belly

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Mazamarama Marinated pork belly

For each two pounds of raw pork belly marinade in the following for up to 12 hours before cooking over campfire: 

1 cup soy sauce

2/3 cup brown sugar

2/3 cup honey

1/3 cup rice vinegar

1/3 bottle lager beer

heaping tablespoon five spice powder

2/3 cup ketchup

1/3 onion finely diced

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Sean D'agnolo's Easter Alluvial Ham

Sean D'agnolo's Easter Alluvial Ham

This Easter, we celebrated with an Alluvial Ham!  I had done the butchering myself, with Matthew and Katie’s pro guidance, and so was excited to see how my boneless variation on the classic would roast up for a spring holiday feast.

I started that morning by brining the Ham.  I would prefer to have a full day in the brine, but life.  I used the bottom end of a growler and a couple of n/a beers a friend had left in my fridge along with plenty of salt and sugar, some rosemary, thyme, sage and bay leaves.  We don’t use as much salt as most brines and we loooove recycling, as you’ll see.  Ideally you heat up the brine to mix the sugar and salt evenly, but I never do and it did a great job, as you’ll see.

From there we put it in our favorite glazed cast iron dutch oven with 2 cups from the brine and into the electric oven at 300 degrees for about an hour and a half.  We use the 20 minute per pound rule, and so at that point our temperature was 140 inside, so then we dropped the temp to 250 and got started on the glaze.

For the glaze we brought back about a cup of that delicious brine and added ¾ cup of honey, some brown sugar, and whatever else was lying around saying “ooh, drizzle me on that pig, baby”.  Cooked that up until it reduced to about a third of its original volume and then took the lid off, cranked it to 400 degrees, drizzled and redrizzled every ten minutes until the glaze was gone.  And here we were:

Mix with some home-grown beans and grits, and serve with friends!

Thanks Hilary & Sean!

Marinated BBQ pork chops for company

Marinated BBQ pork chops for company

Alluvial Farms inducts ourselves into our own Hall of Fame!

We are starting to anticipate our next pork harvest, and looking to clean out the freezer. We had some new friends coming over for dinner and it was the first really sunny afternoon after a very long cold winter. We were celebrating. We whipped up a marinade made of:

onion, mustard, sherry, pepper, juice and zest from one orange, horseradish, olive oil, salt, pepper, paprika, and tarragon. We put twelve chops each in two big ziplock bags with the marinade and put them in the fridge for about six hours. 

We grilled them for three minutes on each side. Alluvial Farms dairy finished pork stays moist and delicious, even on the grill. Friends and family alike enjoyed a feast in the sunshine.  

Pig's Head Roasted Two Ways

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Pig's Head Roasted Two Ways

2016 customer Erika Davis writes "Here are some photos of the first thing we made with Alluvial pork: pig’s head roasted two ways!...

Because the head was conveniently split in two, we thought why not make two different styles. We had a crowd of about 14 to feed for a birthday party, so we went with part-friendly options of tacos and banh mi.

The Mexican style pig was dry rubbed with a blend of various chilies including chile negro, cascabel, and chipotle. The Vietnamese pig was roasted rubbed with salt, cinnamon, and lemongrass, and then lacquered with a hoisin-sesame oil blend in the last fifteen minutes of roasting.

Mexican seasoning...

Mexican seasoning...

Vietnamese seasoning...

Vietnamese seasoning...

For both of the pieces, we scored the fat on the cheeks with a sharp knife before adding the seasonings. Both pieces roasted at 375 for about an hour and then 325 for another 60-90 minutes. The meat sliced off the cheeks beautifully, and everyone enjoyed picking additional meat from all over the heads as served at the table.

Fixings for the tacos included a chile de arbol salsa, pico de gallo, and guacamole. The Vietnamese pork was served on baguette with pork liver pate (purchased from a Vietnamese deli), picked carrots and radish, and lots of fresh basil and mint."

taco fixings...

taco fixings...

Vietnamese sandwich fixings...

Vietnamese sandwich fixings...

Wow, thanks Erika, what a great recipe and story. We can't wait to hear more. 

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